Policing without Police. Republican Paramilitary “Punishment” Attacks on Women in Northern Ireland 1971 – 1979

Juliane Röleke is currently a PhD candidate in history at Humboldt-University Berlin and at Leibniz-Centre for Contemporary Historical Research Potsdam. She has studied history and social sciences in Berlin and Belfast and is working on a project about violence and gender in everday-life during the conflict in Northern Ireland. Her research interest centers around forms of female deviant behaviour during the Troubles, gendered logic of sanctions and feminist interventions. In addition, she is working on the history of Nazi Germany for various memorials and organises educational projects for different football clubs.

Cartoon from: Belfast Telegraph, 13th Nov 1971, p. 6.
Picture courtesy of Belfast Telegraph

A few days after the 21st Miss World contest had taken place in London in November 1971, the Belfast Telegraph published the displayed cartoon by Rowel Friers, connecting the event across the sea to recent incidents in the war-torn province of Northern Ireland.[1] The cartoon picked up the phenomenon of Republican paramilitary “punishment” attacks against Catholic women in the region. It reveals the meaning of gender within informal justice[2] and constitutes itself an example of its sexist logic and perception.

Continue reading “Policing without Police. Republican Paramilitary “Punishment” Attacks on Women in Northern Ireland 1971 – 1979”
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search