Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) in Times of COVID-19

Annika Orich is Assistant Professor of German at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research centers on the intersection between science and art, debates on multiculturalism and migration, discourses on memory and identity, and questions about humor. Her book project on reproductive imaginations shows how reproductive processes in biology and the arts evoke similar anxieties in the German cultural realm. She has published on Germans’ changing attitudes toward their Nazi past and the function of comedy by immigrants in German identity debates, and her article “Archival Resistance: Reading the New Right” is forthcoming (German Politics and Society).

At the end of April 2020, the BioTexCom Center for Human Reproduction posted a four-minute video about babies in the Ukrainian companies’ care who were born via surrogacy and currently unable to be with their parents due to COVID-19 travel restrictions on its YouTube channel.[1] Sitting in a conference room while reading a prepared statement from a MacBook in his lap, BioTexCom’s lawyer addressed clients around the world who had abruptly been prevented from coming to Kiev to meet and pick up their children. Two seconds into the lawyer’s statement, the camera cuts to and pans across neatly arranged rows of swaddled newborns in hospital baby cots.[2]

The crying of these babies—which is used to drown out the voice of BioTexCom’s lawyer—ultimately alert viewers of the extent to which laws not only regulate the unification of families in times of COVID-19, but also facilitate the very existence of these children. In the Ukraine, commercial surrogacy for infertile heterosexual married couples is legal. In Germany, the Embryo Protection Act bans any form of surrogacy.

BioTexCom produced this video to assure parents of the well-being of their children, and to urge them to obtain travel exemptions. Yet the images of rows of babies waiting to meet their intended mothers and fathers for the first time caused a national and international debate on the ethics of surrogate motherhood and the (non-)regulation of the assisted reproductive technology (ART) market.[3]

„Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) in Times of COVID-19“ weiterlesen

Ein Virus ist immer mehr als nur ein Virus

Gedanken zu HIV/AIDS und Covid-19 

Adrian Lehne für „Ruminationen

Die aktuelle Covid-19 Pandemie hat in kurzer Zeit einen radikalen Wandel im Leben fast aller Menschen verursacht. Kontaktreduktion, stay at home, Selbstisolation sind nun gefordert. Wie gesellschaftliches Zusammenleben geht, muss in vielen Bereichen neu ausgelotet und ausprobiert werden. Wie Gesellschaften funktionieren wird nun jeden Tag diskutiert. Viele Berichterstattungen und politischen Kommentare stellten Vergleiche und Bezugnahmen zu den großen Epidemien und Pandemien der letzten Jahrhunderte her, von der Pest bis zur Spanischen Grippe. In queeren Medien finden Vergleiche von Covid-19 und AIDS statt.[1]

„Ein Virus ist immer mehr als nur ein Virus“ weiterlesen